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TALES OF THE TOWN

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The first three chapters

1.

The Return of the Prodigal Son

Danny Eagleton walked out of Terminal A at Oakland Airport, smelled the fresh salt air, felt the soft Spring mist settling on his face, saw the East Bay hills verdant in the distance, and knew he was home.

His Lyft was right where it was supposed to be, a late model white Toyota Camry. He shuffled over to it, peered through the window. His driver—a young woman named Cindy—nodded. He climbed in, dragging his suitcase with him.

“Good trip?” she asked, as he buckled in.

“Yup. Good to be back in the Town.”

Cindy chuckled, as she began negotiating the exit route towards the 880 Freeway. “I know what you mean.”

Nothing had changed in the two years he’d been gone, Danny thought. The same fast food restaurants and gas stations along Hegenberger. Then, approaching the freeway, he saw a large construction project, four stories, with masonry walls being put up on steel girders.

“What’s that?” he asked his driver.

“That? Oh, probably another luxury condo. They’re all over town. You should see mid-Broadway. It’s like a whole new city within a city.”

“That’s near to where I’m going,” Danny said. The driver glanced at her iPhone. “Oh, right. I’m taking you to 737 Perkins. You been away for a while?”

“Yeah. Two years.” He figured she’d ask where he’d been, and why, but Cindy said nothing. She’s probably been told not to ask personal questions, Danny thought. So he added, “Been working for a tech firm in Boston. South of Boston, actually, little town called Milton. Now, they’ve transferred me back here.”

“Sweet,” Cindy acknowledged, lapsing into silence. Danny glanced at the back of her long, brown hair, at her neck. They were now winding their way north along the 880 through thick traffic. At least that hasn’t changed, Danny thought.

He sat back and became thoughtful. His two years back east had been okay, although not particularly memorable. The money was good, but even so, he hadn’t been able to save much, because his rent in Milton, where he’d lived, was high. He hadn’t really made many friends. And the weather! Don’t even ask. Frigid, snowy winters, blazingly hot, humid summers, with a few nice days wedged in between—days that invariably reminded him of Oakland.

Now that he was back, he’d be bunking for a while with his old college buddy, Nick. Nicholas Claudio Huff was his full name. They’d been roommates at Cal for a couple years, sharing a two-bedroom flat on Channing Way. Nick had been into sports: martial arts, track, weightlifting. Nick was more the artistic type. When he came out, in their senior year, Danny wasn’t all that surprised. He’d suspected Nick was gay, but figured it wasn’t his place to bring the subject up.

Now, Nick was working at Pandora, downtown, and was renting a small flat of his own in Adams Point. He was happy to let his old friend stay there, until Danny could get his bearings and find a place of his own. Danny was idly looking out the window, as the driver went on past the Oak Street turnoff, then veered onto the 980 towards the 580 and Broadway. As she approached 27th Street, Nick he saw the spires and skeletons of the new developments.

“Holy shit!” he murmured, half to himself.

“Yeah,” Cindy replied. “They’re like cancer. Gentrification. My rent’s almost doubled since I moved into my place, four years ago. I’m thinking of moving someplace else. Portland, maybe.”

Twenty-seventh was crowded with construction workers in orange jackets. It was lunchtime, and the men (and a few women) were sitting on walls, ledges and curbs, or in their cars, munching on their sandwiches and tacos and drinking colas and water. Food trucks lined the street. When Danny had left two years previously, this area was dead, with unbusy auto repair shops and struggling car dealerships. He could hardly believe his eyes.

Cindy took back streets through the hills above Piedmont Avenue, then crossed the 580 overpass at Adams Street and maneuvered her way through Adams Point, with the GPS lady directing her. Then, there it was, No. 737 Perkins, a three-story beige-colored structure with red pillars and balconies with weird art deco railings.

“Here we are,” Cindy announced, pulling over. Danny thanked her, then rolled the dice. She was cute. He’d lost touch with his girlfriends in the years since he’d been gone. Did she mind if he called her sometime? She smiled shyly (cute!) and said no, she didn’t mind. Danny filed it for future reference.

After she drove off, he stood there for a while, suitcase on the sidewalk beside him, before texting Nick. He just wanted to feel back in Oakland again, to feel himself feeling. An old man passed by, walking a fluffy little white dog. Two young guys across the street were laughing. A Mexican woman, short and stout, was wheeling a baby carriage. Two Somali women came from around the corner, tiny little things, their heads covered with lacy, pastel-colored scarfs. Nick caught something from the corner of his eye, and turned. A Black sagger kid was zooming down Perkins on a lime green scooter, swerving around a double-parked UPS truck. The driver, in brown shirt and shorts, sat behind the wheel, listening to talk radio. From a window somewhere Danny heard the throb of a bass line: someone was listening to dance music. It was the ebb and flow, the flora and fauna of Oakland. After the sterility of Milton, population 27,000 and overwhelmingly white, Danny had to smile. Welcome back to The Town, he said to himself. Then he texted Nick: I’m downstairs.

* * *

2

Danny Moves In

Danny got the sofa to sleep on. That wasn’t the problem. Nick had a “roommate” he hadn’t mentioned.

Flambé was a big woman, easily six feet in her platform heels. When he’d entered the apartment, there she was, this exotic figure, in a glittering multi-colored gown, pink boa curled around her like a snake, slow-dancing to a song he recognized as by Usher that was blasting at about 100 decibels. It was that bass beat he’d heard in the street.

“Danny, this is Flambé.” Nick introduced the two of them after Nick set his bag down. Nick smiled and extended his hand, but Flambé was too busy dancing to take it. “Howyadoin’, honey,” she crooned, in a sultry voice above the pulsing music. “Nice to meet ya. And just to avoid questions, I’m transitioning.”

“She used to be Frank,” Nick offered.

Nick explained the situation a little later, as he and Danny walked down the hill to the Playa Bar, the little sports dive on Grand. “I wasn’t planning on living with anyone after the fiasco with Angel,” he said—causing Danny to remember the shaven-headed hustler Nick had gone with for a few months until realizing that Angel was stealing his prescription drugs and cash. “But then I met Flambé at Club Serenade.”

“I thought you didn’t go to clubs anymore,” Danny said.

“I don’t. But it was a Saturday night, and I was super lonely. And it was the sheets.”

“The sheets?”

“Folding them by myself. That’s got to be the loneliest thing in the world. I wanted somebody to help me fold the sheets. So I walked to Caramba, sat at the bar, ordered an IPA, and the next thing I know, this drag queen is flirting with me, with her hand on my thigh.”

“So she’s a drag queen?”

“Not really. Well, the categories are fuzzy. Frank started his physical transition last year. She’s on hormones, and is now living fulltime as a woman.”

“Somehow, she doesn’t seem your type.” Danny sensed Nick flinching at that, so he hastened to add, “I mean, you go for the rugged, straight type, like Angel, and what’s his name, that guy from the Coast Guard.”

“Bradley.”

“Right. Flambé is hardly what I’d describe as the straight type.”

“I know. But she’s so sweet and kind. I can talk to her in a way I can’t with anyone else, except maybe you. And the sex is—”

“What?”

“Unreal.” Nick laughed out loud. Danny didn’t need to hear any more. By now, they were at the Playa Bar. At this time of day—mid-afternoon—the place was nearly empty. An old Fleetwood Mac song was playing. They sat at the bar in the cool afternoon darkness. Danny ordered his favorite vodka gimlet while Nick asked for an IPA.

Something was bothering Danny, and he had to get it off his chest. “You never told me about Flambé when you said I could stay with you. I mean, I really appreciate it, Nick, but I’m a little uncomfortable with three of us sharing your flat. Just one bathroom. And I get the feeling Flambé listens to a lot of loud music.”

“Yeah, she’s a music freak, all right.”

They lapsed into silence.

“Well,” Nick said, “I mean, would it have made any difference if I’d told you I was living with someone?”

“I guess not,” Danny answered.

“You had nowhere else to go. Besides, Flambé’s cool. You’ll like her. If the music’s a problem, I’ll ask her to keep it down.”

* * *

Flambé had felt like a woman as long as she could remember. When she’d been little—Frank—she much preferred playing with her cousins’ dolls, while the other boys were playing ball, or tear-assing mountain bikes through the foothills of Sunol, where Frank’s parents lived.

In 2000, when he was twelve, Frank saw a T.V. program about transsexuals, on Oprah. His parents, who were strict Catholics, wouldn’t have permitted him to watch it, but he’d been sick that day, and his stay-at-home Mom, Gloria, had gone to Safeway, to get some Robitussin. Frank was mind-struck by the women he saw; one in particular reminded him of Beyoncé. Frank’s heart leapt when she described her own transition process, and how liberated she felt when she finally accepted the fact that she was a woman.

In that moment, in his mind, Frank became Flambé.

He lived a secret life for the next five years, dressing up in Gloria’s clothing when alone, and developing an inner life that was his own, precious secret. In 2005, he was accepted to San Francisco State University, and moved into a dorm there, his first time away from home. He quickly found himself enmeshed in the sexual politics of group identity. There were the gay kids, of course, but even they were divided into all sort of groupings. There were transvestites who were straight but liked wearing women’s clothing, and transvestites who liked other men. There were “straight” guys who enjoyed a little fun when they were drunk—they were on the D.L., Frank learned. And then there were the men who, like him, were convinced that nature had played a cruel trick, or made a mistake, in assigning them the male gender.

Frank wasn’t even old enough to drink when, in his freshman year, an older friend took him to his first club. The Headquarters was South-of-Market, in Clementina Alley. “Just tell the doorman you’re 21 but you forgot your I.D.,” his friend told him. The strategy worked. Frank—5’10”, handsome and lanky, with thick, curly black hair and dark eyes, looked older than his years.

Inside, the music was blaring. People danced in various states of intimacy, or alone. Lasers struck rotating mirrored balls hanging from the ceiling, throwing shards of gleaming light on walls, clothing, faces. A strobe light amplified the hallucinogenic effect. His friend disappeared into the throng, leaving Frank alone. Sipping a coke, his eyes sought out certain among the crowd, including a woman in her thirties, kind of hippie-ish, very pretty, who incongruously reminded him of Phoebe, on Friends. She must have felt him staring at her, for she walked over, smiled, touched the back of his hand, and asked what he was drinking.

That was the beginning of his friendship with Moira. It also marked an important milestone in Frank’s transition to Flambé.

* * *

3

Danny Makes a Friend

It had been a little more than two weeks since Danny returned to Oakland. He was back at work at Creava, an app developer. Danny was in the games division; his current project, which he’d begun in Milton, was called “Game of Bones.” It was a dog-walking challenge, sure to be a hit: users piled up points every time their pet went peepee, with different scores for grass, bushes, trees, telephone poles, fire hydrants. Fifty cents of the $3.99 download price went to the local SPCA.

He was at home, in Nick’s apartment, on one of the rare Friday nights when both Nick and Flambé were out. Danny popped a beer and sat back on the couch to watch T.V. Idly flicking through the channels, he had the sudden inspiration to text Cindy, the Lyft driver.

Hey, it’s Danny, the guy you picked up at Oakland Airport a while back. Remember? Well I was wondering if you wanted to get together for coffee or something.

Almost as soon as he sent it, the reply came back.

Love to! When did you have in mind?

Wow, Danny thought. That was fast.

What are you doing tomorrow evening?

Nothing! My social life leaves something to be desired lol.

Maybe grab a drink?

Sounds good! Nine okay?

Sweet.

Cindy lived off Piedmont Avenue, near Kaiser. They agreed to meet at Playa Bar. Danny was nervous. Was this a date? A casual chat? A meet, greet and dump? That was the thing; you never knew if something was going to work out. For that matter, you never even knew what “work out” meant.

He wasn’t sure what he was looking for. Sure, he wouldn’t mind having a special lady friend. He wasn’t the most physical guy in the world, but he had his desires. He was 27, making fairly good money at Creava, and while he wasn’t looking to settle down, it wasn’t out of the question.

On the Saturday, he went to 24 Hour Fitness and had a long workout, aerobic and weights, followed by a hot shower. Then he slung his gym bag over his shoulder, dropped it off at Nick’s, and walked down to Playa. It was a balmy May night, warm enough to tease out the jasmine. He felt a stirring in his blood.

She was already there, sitting in a booth. She stood when she saw him. They shook hands. He wanted to hug her, but with all the #MeToo business, wasn’t sure if she’d consider that invasive of her personal space.

Cindy wouldn’t have minded hugging Danny either, but, like him, she held back. Don’t be needy, she told herself. Still, she liked what she saw. Danny was a cutie. Not very tall, only three or four inches more than her own 5’6”, but well-proportioned, with a flat stomach and narrow waist, and she could tell that he was a weightlifter. He also had, she noticed approvingly, a nice ass.

Danny took the lead. “What would’ya like?”

“Umm, I don’t know.” Cindy studied the chalkboard. “I guess a Negroni.”

“Give me a minute.” Danny walked to the bar. It was crowded. The bartender was mixing drinks; there was nothing to do but wait. He smiled over his shoulder to Cindy. She smiled back.

When he got their drinks (despite his preference for gimlets he, like her, had a Negroni), Nick went back to their booth. He lifted his glass; she brought hers to his with a clink. They both said “L’chaim!” and laughed at the simultaneity. Danny felt like he knew her, even though they’d barely exchanged a dozen words.

Two hours and four Negronis later, Cindy said she had to be going, to walk her French bulldog, Klutz. “You okay to drive?” Danny asked. Cindy grinned. “I’m fine.” He walked her to her car, the white Camry she’d picked him up in. She unlocked the door but didn’t get in, just stood there. So did he.

It was “that moment.” Should he? Shouldn’t he?

He didn’t have to wonder long. Before he knew it, Cindy took him into her arms and shoved her tongue through his all-too-willing lips. Danny reciprocated, parrying her tongue mid-palate with his own. Each had the impression of exploring infinite sweetness. Then, wordlessly, she tugged away, got into her car, and drove away.

Danny watched as the Camry headed west down Grand. Even when it had vanished into the distance, he remained transfixed. He was, it occurred to him, high, and not just from the drinks. It was as though he had forgotten how to walk. Or maybe he simply didn’t want to jar the memory of what had happened. When he finally caught himself moving, he had no idea how long he’d been standing. He was left with a single, ravishing thought: Cindy!


TALES OF THE TOWN

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Danny Makes a Friend

It had been a little more than two weeks since Danny returned to Oakland. He was back at work at Creava, an app developer. Danny was in the games division; his current project, which he’d begun in Milton, was called “Game of Bones.” It was a dog-walking challenge, sure to be a hit: users piled up points every time their pet went peepee, with different scores for grass, bushes, trees, telephone poles, fire hydrants. Fifty cents of the $3.99 download price went to the local SPCA.

He was at home, in Nick’s apartment, on one of the rare Friday nights when both Nick and Flambé were out. Danny popped a beer and sat back on the couch to watch T.V. Idly flicking through the channels, he had the sudden inspiration to text Cindy, the Lyft driver.

Hey, it’s Danny, the guy you picked up at Oakland Airport a while back. Remember? Well I was wondering if you wanted to get together for coffee or something.

Almost as soon as he sent it, the reply came back.

Love to! When did you have in mind?

Wow, Danny thought. That was fast.

What are you doing tomorrow evening?

Nothing! My social life leaves something to be desired lol.

Maybe grab a drink?

Sounds good! Nine okay?

Sweet.

Cindy lived off Piedmont Avenue, near Kaiser. They agreed to meet at Playa Bar. Danny was nervous. Was this a date? A casual chat? A meet, greet and dump? That was the thing; you never knew if something was going to work out. For that matter, you never even knew what “work out” meant.

He wasn’t sure what he was looking for. Sure, he wouldn’t mind having a special lady friend. He wasn’t the most physical guy in the world, but he had his desires. He was 27, making fairly good money at Creava, and while he wasn’t looking to settle down, it wasn’t out of the question.

On the Saturday, he went to 24 Hour Fitness and had a long workout, aerobic and weights, followed by a hot shower. Then he slung his gym bag over his shoulder, dropped it off at Nick’s, and walked down to Playa. It was a balmy May night, warm enough to tease out the jasmine. He felt a stirring in his blood.

She was already there, sitting in a booth. She stood when she saw him. They shook hands. He wanted to hug her, but with all the #MeToo business, wasn’t sure if she’d consider that invasive of her personal space.

Cindy wouldn’t have minded hugging Danny either, but, like him, she held back. Don’t be needy, she told herself. Still, she liked what she saw. Danny was a cutie. Not very tall, only three or four inches more than her own 5’6”, but well-proportioned, with a flat stomach and narrow waist, and she could tell that he was a weightlifter. He also had, she noticed approvingly, a nice ass.

Danny took the lead. “What would’ya like?”

“Umm, I don’t know.” Cindy studied the chalkboard. “I guess a Negroni.”

“Give me a minute.” Danny walked to the bar. It was crowded. The bartender was mixing drinks; there was nothing to do but wait. He smiled over his shoulder to Cindy. She smiled back.

When he got their drinks (despite his preference for gimlets he, like her, had a Negroni), Nick went back to their booth. He lifted his glass; she brought hers to his with a clink. They both said “L’chaim!” and laughed at the simultaneity. Danny felt like he knew her, even though they’d barely exchanged a dozen words.

Two hours and four Negronis later, Cindy said she had to be going, to walk her French bulldog, Klutz. “You okay to drive?” Danny asked. Cindy grinned. “I’m fine.” He walked her to her car, the white Camry she’d picked him up in. She unlocked the door but didn’t get in, just stood there. So did he.

It was “that moment.” Should he? Shouldn’t he?

He didn’t have to wonder long. Before he knew it, Cindy took him into her arms and shoved her tongue through his all-too-willing lips. Danny reciprocated, parrying her tongue mid-palate with his own. Each had the impression of exploring infinite sweetness. Then, wordlessly, she tugged away, got into her car, and drove away.

Danny watched as the Camry headed west down Grand. Even when it had vanished into the distance, he remained transfixed. He was, it occurred to him, high, and not just from the drinks. It was as though he had forgotten how to walk. Or maybe he simply didn’t want to jar the memory of what had happened. When he finally caught himself moving, he had no idea how long he’d been standing. He was left with a single, ravishing thought: Cindy!


My blog continues to evolve

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Starting tomorrow, I’m trying something new: daily chapters of a new fictionalized series I’m writing, called “Tales of the Town.”

This means I’ll be transitioning away from the anti-Trump, all-the-time approach I’ve had since September, 2016. At that time, if you’ll recall, I had just retired from the wine business, and decided there was no longer any point in having a wine-oriented blog if I wasn’t even in the industry! Trump had just gotten the Republican nomination for president and, being aware of what a thoroughly evil, disgusting and dangerous person he was, I dedicated my blog to exposing his crimes and bringing him down. I thus became an early member of The Resistance, although we didn’t call it that until later.

It’s no longer necessary for me to write a daily anti-Trump blog, for several reasons. For one, with the end of the Mueller probe, we’ve entered a new chapter in the history of this regime (which I still trust will end soon). For another, The Resistance is now ingrained in the hearts and minds of countless millions of Americans. They no longer need to be rallied; they understand how corrupt Trump is, and everybody around him, and they–the American people–are well-prepared to carry the fight forward, for as long as necessary, until the crimes he has committed have been punished. So The Resistance is in good hands; it won’t suffer a bit if my small voice is temporarily quieted.

I had heard the good news that Armistead Maupin’s “Tales of the City” is returning to T.V. That was always one of my favorite P.B.S. shows. I moved to San Francisco in 1979, roughly the time setting of “Tales,” and the show meant a great deal to me personally, as it did to many others. As I thought about the original “Tales,” it occurred to me to write a modern version of it: this time, the cast of characters would be set in Oakland, in the present time, and the action would take place primarily in the neighborhoods around Adams Point, the central section of the city I make my home.

I published the first chapter (about 900 words) on nextdoor.com last week. Immediately, people began writing in words of encouragement. They seemed to like it a lot, and asked me to keep on publishing new installments. But then I ran into trouble with nextdoor.com. It was a problem I, and many others, have encountered before. Nextdoor is governed in each neighborhood by so-called “Leads.” These are people who can essentially do anything they want, for any reason or for no reason, without explanation, without transparency, and without being held to account. A sort of Star Chamber, they can remove posts anonymously, with no prior warning to the poster, offering no reasons whatever for their censorship, and no means of appeal. Quite often, these Leads appear to be bullies, enjoying the abuse of power in order to give their lives a little meaning.

Thus, they took down my “Tales of the Town” story. I was shocked–it was good, strong writing, it expressed my love of Oakland, and it had been liked by the readers! Yet there was nothing I could do. Nextdoor.com Leads refused to reply to my inquiries. So did their service department, in San Francisco. Because of their heavy-handed, authoritarian approach–so reminiscent of Trump–I was on my own. One of my readers suggested putting “Tales of the Town” on a blog. Well, I thought, I already have a blog, and a nice one, with good graphics.

For a couple days I struggled with this decision. I’ve been committed to anti-Trump writing on my blog for years. The work is very important. It’s been a driving motivation for me, five days a week, 52 weeks a year. Giving it up was like amputating one of my limbs.

But I made the decision. Like I said, starting tomorrow, steveheimoff.com will focus on “Tales of the Town.” This doesn’t mean I won’t revert back to anti-Trump stuff, as the occasion warrants. But it does allow me to get back to the kind of creative, imaginative writing I love.

So there you have it! I hope you’ll enjoy reading “Tales of the Town” even if you don’t live in Oakland. Maupin’s “Tales of the City” appealed to millions of people who didn’t live in San Francisco. People want good writing, wonderful characters with rich, interesting lives, and fascinating situations. Maupin provided all that, and it’s my aim, too, with “Tales of the Town.”


Trump’s Night of the Long Knives

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He’s doing it.

As many of us had feared and warned, Trump is making his penultimate move to completely take over the U.S. government with his hand-picked flunkies. Last week he fired Kristen Nielsen, because she wasn’t tough enough, even though she masterminded the “Throw Brown-Skinned Babies in Jail” horror for which History will always condemn her.

Now, he’s fired his own Secret Service chief, the man responsible for protecting his life, and the lives of his family. There can be only one explanation as to why: Trump is seizing control of his security apparatus, in precisely the same way that Hitler did, after taking power in Germany.

“The Night of the Long Knives” is what they called that 1934 action, in which Hitler sent his men out to arrest, torture and murder anyone he thought was against him. Hundreds were killed overnight; it was an unprecedented act of vengeance. Hitler had waited more than a year after becoming Chancellor to get his revenge. He needed that time to secure his position, to make sure he controlled every aspect of Germany—including the free press, which he had systematically destroyed. Hitler even killed the head of own private army of thugs, the Brownshirts, Ernest Roehm, who until then had been responsible for his safety. After The Night of the Long Knives, all effective opposition to the Nazi terror regime was ended. Only a disastrous war that killed 100 million people around the world would stop Hitler’s psychotic death march.

Trump’s communications people—Sarah Huckabee Sanders and Kellyanne Conway—and his other propagandists are trying to describe the latest firings as routine. They’re lying. Nobody but Trump, and possibly Jared and Donald Junior, knows precisely what Trump is going to do next. But we can surmise. He’s in the middle of an historic power grab. The Election result of 2018 stunned him, but he decided it was only a setback, not a defeat. Then the Barr lie about the Mueller Report (carefully orchestrated by Trump) came out, and Trump became Godzilla Unleased. Like Hitler, he’s as angry as a man can be without having a stroke, and is hellbent on wreaking vengeance on his enemies, who are legion. He’s already cleansed his Cabinet and the West Wing staff around him. He’s been stuffing the Courts with rightwing ideologues. The Republicans that remain in the Congress are absolutely stupefied, in terror of him, as were the Nazi officials after The Night of the Long Knives, who rightfully feared for their lives. Today’s Republicans don’t fear for their physical lives but for their political lives.

So what’s next? Trump is looking around at every American institution over which he commands power, to determine which ones are solidly behind him, and which are wavering. My guess is that sooner or later it will be the Military that Trump interferes with. Whatever he’s got in mind, the Army (including National Guard) and Marines, in particular, are the only things that could effectively stand in opposition to him. It’s always that way in authoritarian regimes: if the Dictator can get the military, he’s home free.

I don’t think Trump has the military yet. His people like to claim that the rank-and-file soldier, sailor and Marine is with Trump. That may well be true, but it’s the senior command leadership, as well as the mid-level commissioned officers, we have to watch. Trump may already be quietly at work purging their ranks. Keep your eye on the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Joseph Dunford. On the surface he seems like a career Marine. His career has been boosted by both George W. Bush and Barack Obama, who liked him. He portrays himself as anti-political.

If anything goes down in this country of a serious internal nature, Dunford is going to play a very important role. Donald Trump knows that. If he’s not entirely sure he can trust Dunford, he’ll move against him.


Tales of the Town

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The Return of the Prodigal Son

Danny Eagleton walked out of Terminal A at Oakland Airport, smelled the fresh salt air, felt the soft Spring mist settling on his face, saw the East Bay hills verdant in the distance, and knew he was home.

His Lyft was right where it was supposed to be, a late model white Toyota Camry. He shuffled over to it, peered through the window. His driver—a young woman named Cindy—nodded. He climbed in, dragging his suitcase with him.

“Good trip?” she asked, as he buckled in.

“Yup. Good to be back in the Town.”

Cindy chuckled, as she began negotiating the exit route towards the 880 Freeway. “I know what you mean.”

Nothing had changed in the two years he’d been gone, Danny thought. The same fast food restaurants and gas stations along Hegenberger. Then, approaching the freeway, he saw a large construction project, four stories, with masonry walls being put up on steel girders.

“What’s that?” he asked his driver.

“That? Oh, probably another luxury condo. They’re all over town. You should see mid-Broadway. It’s like a whole new city within a city.”

“That’s near to where I’m going,” Danny said. The driver glanced at her iPhone. “Oh, right. I’m taking you to 737 Perkins. You been away for a while?”

“Yeah. Two years.” He figured she’d ask where he’d been, and why, but Cindy said nothing. She’s probably been told not to ask personal questions, Danny thought. So he added, “Been working for a tech firm in Boston. South of Boston, actually. Now, they’ve transferred me back here.”

“Sweet,” Cindy acknowledged, lapsing into silence. Danny glanced at the back of her long, brown hair, at her neck. They were now winding their way north along the 880 through thick traffic. At least that hasn’t changed, Danny thought.

He sat back and became thoughtful. His two years back east had been okay, although not particularly memorable. The money was good, but even so, he hadn’t been able to save much, because his rent in Milton, where he’d lived, was high. He hadn’t really made many friends. And the weather! Don’t even ask. Frigid, snowy winters, blazingly hot, humid summers, with a few nice days wedged in between—days that invariably reminded him of Oakland.

Now that he was back, he’d be bunking for a while with his old college buddy, Nick. Nicholas Claudio Huff was his full name. They’d been roommates at Cal for a couple years, sharing a two-bedroom flat on Channing Way. Nick had been into sports: martial arts, track, weightlifting. Nick was more the artistic type. When he came out, in their senior year, Danny wasn’t all that surprised. He’d suspected Nick was gay, but figured it wasn’t his place to bring the subject up.

Now, Nick was working at Pandora, downtown, and was renting a small flat of his own in Adams Point. He was happy to let his old friend stay there, until Danny could get his bearings and find a place of his own. Danny was idly looking out the window, as the driver went on past the Oak Street turnoff, then veered onto the 980 towards the 580 and Broadway. As she approached 27th Street, Nick he saw the spires and skeletons of the new developments.

“Holy shit!” he murmured, half to himself.

“Yeah,” Cindy replied. “They’re like cancer. Gentrification. My rent’s almost doubled since I moved into my place, four years ago. I’m thinking of moving someplace else. Portland, maybe.”

Twenty-seventh was crowded with construction workers in orange jackets. It was lunchtime, and the men (and a few women) were sitting on walls, ledges and curbs, or in their cars, munching on their sandwiches and tacos and drinking colas and water. Food trucks lined the street. When Danny had left two years previously, this area was dead, with unbusy auto repair shops and struggling car dealerships. He could hardly believe his eyes.

Cindy took back streets through the hills above Piedmont Avenue, then crossed the 580 overpass at Adams Street and maneuvered her way through Adams Point, with the GPS lady directing her. Then, there it was, No. 737 Perkins, a three-story beige-colored structure with red pillars and balconies with weird art deco railings.

“Here we are,” Cindy announced, pulling over. Danny thanked her, then rolled the dice. She was cute. He’d lost touch with his girlfriends in the years since he’d been gone. Did she mind if he called her sometime? She smiled shyly (cute!) and said no, she didn’t mind. Danny filed it for future reference.

After she drove off, he stood there for a while, suitcase on the sidewalk beside him, before texting Nick. He just wanted to feel back in Oakland again, to feel himself feeling. An old man passed by, walking a fluffy little white dog. Two young guys across the street were laughing. A Mexican woman, short and stout, was wheeling a baby carriage. Two Somali women came from around the corner, tiny little things, their heads covered with lacy, pastel-colored scarfs. Nick caught something from the corner of his eye, and turned. A Black sagger kid was zooming down Perkins on a lime green scooter, swerving around a double-parked UPS truck. The driver, in brown shirt and shorts, sat behind the wheel, listening to talk radio. From a window somewhere Danny heard the throb of a bass line: someone was listening to dance music. It was the ebb and flow, the flora and fauna of Oakland. After the sterility of Milton, population 27,000 and overwhelmingly white, Danny had to smile. Welcome back to The Town, he said to himself. Then he texted Nick: I’m downstairs.


Trump and Holocaust deniers: What they have in common

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Just a few weeks ago, David Irving, the World War II writer, turned 81. Irving calls himself “one of the best-known historians in the world,” but his Wikipedia entry has a rather more somber description by which History will remember him: “Holocaust denier.”

Irving earned that reputation through a series of books and articles in which he argued that Hitler knew little or nothing about the extermination camps, that it was Himmler who did it all, that there were no gas chambers at Auschwitz (which he called “a tourist attraction” built by the Poles after the war), and that in any case the number of Jews murdered was nowhere near the millions routinely cited. That virtually every historian over the last 65 years has argued otherwise, and that a vast documentation of first-hand evidence, including Nuremberg testimony, exists disproving Irving’s refutations, has never made any difference to him. (Irving was actually sentenced to three years in jail in Austria for his Holocaust denialism.)

He is temperamental when it comes to criticism. In the 1990s an American historian, Deborah Lipstadt, who taught at Emory University, wrote a book, “Denying the Holocaust: The Growing Assault on Truth and Memory,” in which she called Irving to account. Not mincing her words, she referred to Irving as a “Hitler partisan wearing blinkers,” quoted Irving himself as a “one-man intifada’ against the official history of the Holocaust,” and later warned that “The impact of Holocaust denial on high school and college students cannot be precisely assessed.”

In 2000, an outraged Irving sued Lipstadt for libel in Great Britain, where the libel laws favor plaintiffs (in this case, the plaintiff was Irving. Defendant Lipstadt had to prove her allegations were true, instead of Irving’s lawyers having to prove they were false). Despite the built-in advantage, Irving lost, badly. The ruling judge declared “that Irving not only denied the Holocaust but is ‘a right-wing, pro-Nazi polemicist’ who mixes with neo-fascists…and for his own ideological reasons persistently and deliberately misrepresented and manipulated historical evidence.” Similar verdicts were reached in other Courts, including in Germany’s highest court.

Does any of this sound familiar? The denial of truth…the deliberate misreprentation of historical fact…appealing to biased people for ideological reasons… manipulating evidence…Yes, this also applies to Donald J. Trump and his extreme enablers, alt-right people like Alex Jones, Tucker Carlson, Sean Hannity, Rush Limbaugh and for that matter most of the Republicans in Congress. In fact, the sub-title of Lipstadt’s book, “The Growing Assault on Truth and Memory,” was a prescient foreshadowing of exactly what we see happening today in the U.S., where right-wing neo-fascists are deliberately playing with people’s minds, making them doubt the truth and even persuading them to dis-remember things they’d seen for themselves.

Lipstadt’s warning about the effects of historical denialism on high school and college students is particularly chilling, when you realize that many of the Trump cult were young in the 1990s. Donald Trump wasn’t a student in 2000—he was already 54 years old. But his mindset is curiously and scarily similar to Irving’s. I can find no evidence that Trump ever read any of Irving’s books (or any other books, for that matter), but there’s plenty of indirect evidence that Trump adopted the Irving methodology of “deny, lie, obfuscate, repeat.” Trump used this formula when he persistently accused Obama of being a foreigner. He uses it when he calls climate-change a “hoax,” when he lies about things like the size of his inaugural crowd, when he says his loss of the popular vote in 2016 was due to massive voter fraud, when he tweets that vaccines are linked to autism, and all the rest of his disinformation.

The impact of these claims on weak-minded conservative minds is predictable. Trump convinces people that any facts that contradict him or with which he disagrees are “fake news,” and should not be believed. As Lipstadt said in a 2017 interview in Esquire, “Once you believe everything is rigged, then the truth doesn’t matter.”

Like the rest of us, Lipstadt has been waiting for the tipping point, when Trump’s supporters start to peel away from him. “It’s very difficult,” she said in the Esquire interview, “but I’m hoping, with the exception of his die-hard supporters, if he does enough of this, people will begin to be skeptical about the things he says.”

That’s what we’re all hoping. We’ve seen no signs of it yet in the Republican electorate. We’re seeing subtle signs in the Senate, where Republicans are juuust beginning to show a little spine. But based on their craven, past performance, I wouldn’t bet on it.


Mueller Report: the beat goes on (just like I said)

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The funniest thing about the news lately concerns the Republican Party. They seriously thought that after their guy, Barr, put out his propaganda sheet, RussiaGate was over.

We are now rolling on the floor laughing out loud.

Republicans: IT’S NOT OVER! In fact, it’s just getting started.

We now know (although we’ve suspected all along) that Barr’s little letter was a complete farce. Mueller’s own team didn’t buy it! In order to get hired as Attorney-General, Barr performed a very public act of kissing Donald Trump’s fat rear end, in what is called in political circles “sucking up.” Barr obviously got the job by promising he would protect Trump no matter what. Now, he’s following through on his promise, and is protecting Trump no matter what. That “no matter what” includes Barr’s professional reputation, which has been shredded and will remain in the toilet; but perhaps at this end-stage of his career, he doesn’t care. Morel likely, his descendants will, as they will be asked about this for many years.

With the stunning revelation late yesterday, courtesy of the New York Times, that “some members” of the Mueller team are unhappy with Barr’s characterization of the Report, RussiaGate, including collusion, is again a Big News Story. I knew, and many of you knew, that Barr was lying in his letter when he said Mueller had exonerated Trump entirely. Trump consciously lied when he claimed the same thing. That was the deal they’d struck.

Trump: When this Report comes out, you need to immediately shield it from public view, and issue a statement that it exonerates me 100%.

Barr: Right, chief.

Trump: The Report will eventually have to come out, but we’ll stonewall as long as we can, and in the meantime, the impression that I’m exonerated will sink into the public’s mind.

Barr: Brilliant strategy, Mister President. You can count on me!

Only they miscalculated. The only part of the public that thinks Trump has been exonerated are the psychos at Breitbart. Nobody else’s mind has been changed a bit: Americans still believe Trump did all kinds of nasty things, and moreover, his approval ratings actually dropped after Barr put out his propaganda.

It now appears that Team Trump is going to fight to the bitter end against letting the Mueller Report get out. Fine; but the American people (again, excepting the Breitbart/Limbaugh cult) won’t buy it. The overwhelming question will remain: What is Trump trying to hide? That’s a question reasonable people will ask each other at the dinner table, by the office water cooler, in Starbucks. And reasonable people will conclude that Trump has plenty to hide.

I’ve always said, despite Trump’s reputation for Teflon, as soon as the first chink appears in his armor, the spread of rot will become uncontainable. It won’t take all that many Americans turning against him to entirely change the political dynamic. Let’s say 50% of Americans are solidly against him. Thirty-five percent are for him, even if he should admit to being a child predator. The remaining 15% are squishy. All that Democrats need is for a majority of them to conclude that (in Pelosi’s words) Trump “just isn’t worth it,” and they’ll be shopping around for someone clean in 2020. It might be a Democrat; it might be an independent; it might be a moderate Republican like Romney, should he choose to run (and I don’t think he has the guts, but you never know). With all the House investigations just getting underway (including into Trump’s taxes—again, what’s he afraid of?), the damage to him is getting more severe everyday day.

Do Democrats enjoy inflicting damage on Trump? Not particularly. We’d much rather have a decent, honest administration, even if it’s under a Republican president. But Trump started this war of attrition with his foul, vulgar lowness. Democrats had no choice but to fight back with everything we’ve got. We did; we will continue doing so.

More tomorrow.


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