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Santa Barbara: Day 2

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My visit to Santa Barbara County continues apace, as they say. Yesterday dawned clear and cold, with frost on the windowpanes of the little red cottage. We took a little walk, Gus and I, and he basically lost it when he saw the goats—critters he’d never encountered before. Bien Nacido, which is much more than merely a vineyard, but is a working ranch, must be an infinitude of smells for a dog with a nose as big as Gus’s. He’s half Chihuahua; they were bred to be ratters, I’m told, and he is the sniffiest dog I’ve even known, able to obsess on a single point of a leaf for as long as I let him.

Anyway, later, I drove with Bien Nacido’s vineyard manager, Chris Hammell, and their new winemaker, Trey Fletcher, to the Miller’s Solomon Hills Vineyard, where we tasted through some Bien Nacido and SH Pinot Noirs and Chardonnays. Nicholas Miller was lucky to lure Trey away from Littorai. For such a young [31] man, Trey has an impressive resumé and I’m sure that both the BNV and SH brands are in good hands. Trey is obviously thrilled at being able to work with fruit of that quality.

Then it was on to Presqu’ile, a newish winery in the western part of the Santa Maria Valley whose owners, the Murphy family, have big plans. Matt Murphy showed me the enormous construction project they’re engaged in, which surely must make the contractors and builders of Santa Barbara County ecstatic in this economy. Matt plans to put in a big tasting room with tourist amenities, such as visiting chefs preparing wine-and-food pairings. The topic of bringing tourists into Santa Maria Valley often arises down here, as the wine people are acutely aware that fashionable Santa Ynez Valley gets all the foot traffic, and frankly, there’s nothing for visitors to do in SMV, except to drive from tasting room to tasting room. A real dearth of decent restaurants and no place to stay worthy of mention. So maybe the Presqu’ile people can start to turn that around. Presqu’ile’s winemaker is Dieter Conje, the dreaded [as in hair] South African who’s turned into a pal over the last year or so. He was on my panel at the 2011 Chardonnay Symposium and I guarantee he’ll be on it next year because he’s articulate, funny and smart, exactly the qualities a panel moderator needs his panel participants to possess. Presqu’ile’s wines, incidentally, are quite good. They’ve been buying fruit, but the estate vineyard is starting to come into production, and I predict it is going to be the source of spectacular Pinot Noir.

After that, we went back to the little red cottage, where I’d left Gus, and man, was he happy to see me and take another walk. He tugged me straight to the goat field, but they were gone! The Mexican field hands had brought them someplace else and Gus was disappointed. He’d particularly liked watching the rams butt each other, and I think their mounting behavior totally puzzled him.

Finally it was back to Santa Ynez for a long, lugubrious dinner at Mattei’s, a local favorite. Lots of winemakers there. It’s always a little weird to know that they’ve turned out for me, so I try to return the respect by letting them know how highly I think of Santa Barbara County wine. It’s true, and it completely blows my mind that many other writers, some quite well known, tend to dismiss the region, as evidenced by how seldom they visit it. At least, that’s what the winemakers tell me, and after all, they would know! Andrew Murray was there, his hair much shorter than when I first met him, but looking fit and trim. Chad Melville, too, whom I toasted (along with his partner, Greg Brewer, who wasn’t there) as my first hosts to Santa, err, Sta. Rita Hills when I first visited. They schlepped me all over the place, answering my questions [this was back in the 90s] and being such fine ambassadors for the region—a role they’ve played with many others. One of my favorites, John Falcone, was there. I’ve known John since his Atlas Peak days but fortunately he’s now at Rusack, and also has his own brand, Falcone, from Paso Robles grapes. The delightful Paul Lato was there, enigmatic and smiling and funny. Blair Fox, Sam Spencer, Ryan Devolet, Matt Dees, a cat named Max Gleason I don’t know much about except that he was an artist in NYC and Kurt Aamman rounded out the group. Everybody brought at least one bottle, which meant a lot of wine, and personally speaking I indulged happily because I didn’t have to drive. The topics of conversation included the 2011 vintage [challenging to say the least] and what makes Santa Barbara different from Napa Valley. The consensus was that SBC is about farming, with all that implies: a sense of rectitude, of rural modesty, self-sufficiency and helping your neighbors. I’m not sure the Napans wouldn’t say the same things about themselves. But without being able to exactly put my finger on it, Santa Barbara County is a very special place; and the wines speak for themselves.


Today’s post is ostensibly about Santa Barbara

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I’ll be bringing Gus with me today on the 5 hour drive down to Bien Nacido Vineyard, the first leg of my Santa Barbara trip. This will be Gus’s longest voyage yet, and I can only hope his car sickness issues have been resolved.

If I recall correctly, my first visit to Santa Barbara, for the purposes of writing about its wine industry, was to the Fess Parker Winery. It was a thrill to meet Fess himself. As a little kid, he’d been one of my heroes as Davy Crockett. I made my mom buy me a coonskin cap (as did millions of other little American boys). That fad, which mercifully didn’t last too long, probably sent the native raccoon population dangerously close to extinction. How Fess Parker went from being a T.V. and movie star to a winery proprietor, I never did find out. I think on that first trip I also visited with Richard Sanford–at the Sanford & Benedict Vineyard? Memory fails.

I like Santa Barbara, as a place and as an appellation. Perhaps because they developed their wine industry more slowly than the North Coast, their AVAs make a lot more sense than, say, Sonoma’s. There are only four of them: the Santa Maria Valley, the Santa Ynez Valley, Happy Canyon and the Santa Rita Hills. The latter used to be part of the Santa Ynez Valley, but wiser heads prevailed in determining that it should be its own appellation on the basis of weather patterns. The Valley is one of only two wine valleys in California (Santa Maria is the other) that lies east-west rather than southeast-northwest (as, for example, are Napa Valley and Alexander Valley). This so-called “transverse” orientation allows chilly maritime air to funnel in from the coast, at Lompoc, spilling over the Santa Rita Hills and cooling them down. By the time you get to the 101 Freeway, the coastal influence has dropped considerably; and at Happy Canyon, it’s virtually non-existent, although there must be a little of it, because otherwise Happy Canyon would be as hot as the Mojave Desert.

For years there’s been talk of adding a fifth AVA, Los Alamos, which sits kind of inbetween Santa Maria Valley and Santa Rita Hills. If they ever do that, I’m going to have to figure out what makes Los Alamos special, if anything. The American system of appellations always provides wine writers with endless fodder for intellectual speculation. Appellations are elusive things. At first, you think they make sense, and then, the more you look into them, the less sense they make. I wrote about the expanded Russian River Valley the other day, and that elicited several comments, among which was one from Charlie Olken, whose blog is always a good read. He said that the Russian River Valley is a really cumbersome appellation–too big, too varied–a view with which I largely agree. But there are plenty of other equally cumbersome appellations and nobody ever complains about them. The Santa Cruz Mountains doesn’t really make a lot of sense, because they grow their Pinot Noir on cooler west-facing slopes and the Cabernet Sauvignon on warmer east-facing slopes, and where’s the unity in that? Napa Valley is a crazy mixed up appellation, making terroir sense only in the most general way. (The real terroir of Napa Valley is money. Money, more than weather or soil, is what primarily influences all the wines of Napa Valley.) Then we have other nonsensical AVAs: San Francisco Bay, Sonoma Coast, Northern Sonoma.

But Santa Barbara County has got it about right. I imagine there will be opportunities for further subdivisions one of these days. Maybe the Santa Rita Hills can be broken up into northern and southern sections. They may decide to carve something out of the northern Santa Ynez Valley, in the Foxen Canyon area. But in these matters of appellations, my advice always is to go slow. No use rushing into legal things you’ll regret later.

Some of the things I’ll be doing in Santa Barbara, in addition to my big blind tasting on Thursday, will be seeing friends, both new and old. Among them are Nicholas Miller, Andrew Murray, Paul Lato, Chad Melville, John Falcone, Ryan Devolet, Dieter Cronje, Dan Gainey, Greg Brewer and Pierre LaBarge. If I run into Jim Clendenen, that will be the cherry on top of the whipped cream on the chocolate cake.


SF Chron’s wine section wins big, and Santa Barbara field notes

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Hearty congratulations to the San Francisco Chronicle’s Wine & Food section, and especially to wine editor Jon Bonné and food editor Miriam Morgan, for winning this year’s James Beard Foundation award for best coverage in a general interest publication.

I have followed the Chron’s wine coverage for many years, ever since I arrived in San Francisco. I still have articles and reviews I clipped in the 1980s, which I saved because they taught me so much. At one point, in the late 1990s or early 2000s, the Chron actually made the wine section a separate part of the Sunday paper, and wine fans throughout Northern California were proud. I think the Chron was the only American paper to have a standalone wine section, which it should have had, given the city’s centrality to wine country. Alas, the economy forced the paper to merge the wine and food sections together again some years ago.

I know it hasn’t been easy for the paper to sustain the expenses of a wine and food section. The Chron, which is owned by Hearst Corp., like all newspapers is under an intense financial squeeze. They had to raise subscription rates to a ridiculously high level, and believe me, this year I renewed hesitantly. But I want to read my morning Chron with my coffee and breakfast. You get what you pay for.

I look forward to reading the wine and food section every Sunday. I want to see what Jon is up to, what he’s thinking about. Half the recipes I’ve tinkered with over the years came from there. The wine section unfortunately isn’t as lengthy or meaty as it used to be, but Jon does the best he can on a limited budget, and his essays are always well-informed and written well. He is a serious scholar of wine who knows how to transmit his knowledge to his readers. Moreover, the paper’s wine recommendations are players on the sales side. Marketers tell me a good review in the Chron moves SKUs (as, I might add, a good Wine Enthusiast review does). That’s power.

The truth is that wineries still need publicity to push sales, and printed publicity remains the best kind. Print has a gravitas that online doesn’t. Even though there’s nothing staler that a day old newspaper (“Who wants yesterday’s papers?” Mick Jagger famously sang), and the Chron’s late, great columnist Herb Cane used to refer to “Friday fishwrap,” a newspaper or magazine still has greater staying power than anything online. This is why, I think, winemakers would rather meet with, and taste with, a credible print writer than an online person (unless the online person’s site is connected to a respectable print publication). It’s harder to establish yourself in print than online. Jon Bonné didn’t just arrive at the Chronicle one morning, announce “I’m here,” and get handed the wine editorship. (Come to think of it, I don’t really know what Jon’s background is. Maybe he’ll read this and provide a bio.)

* * *

I’m back from my Santa Barbara trip. It was grueling, as I was kept busy around the clock from early in the morning until well after dinner, and my hosts kept wondering how I was doing. Fine, energy-wise and palate-wise. But my throat gave out. I developed some weird form of laryngitis, a combination of an allergic reaction to Spring pollens and nonstop talking. I don’t usually talk much during the day, working alone as I do at the computer, but on a wine trip, where you’re meeting with winemakers for 12 hours a day, you talk a lot, and I just plain wore out my voicebox. I hope people didn’t mind my squeakiness. My palate was fine, even superb. The laryngitis didn’t affect my sense of taste or smell at all. Santa Barbara County is really producing such great wines. Once again, people down there told me how grateful they are that Wine Enthusiast and I pay them personal attention. Apparently not everyone does. In return, all I could do was squeak out words to the effect that it’s I who am grateful for everyone down in SBC being so nice to me. All of my reviews will appear in future issues of the magazine.


Day 3: Santa Barbara visit

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Down here in Bien Nacido Vineyard, the vines are looking healthy and green. I read yesterday that Paso Robles experienced severe frost last month. Here, 100 miles further south, there was evidently some damage, especially in the Santa Ynez Valley, but not as severe. Summer arrives much earlier in Santa Barbara County than in San Luis Obispo. Yesterday, it was about 90, although today a front is moving through with a big cooldown, which I think the growers welcome. Such a beautiful vineyard, Bien Nacido, bringing back memories of such great wines. Much construction too, of new roads and even dwellings on this large, almost feudal estate, which suggests to me business is good despite the economy.

I tasted a red wine yesterday, a Syrah from Happy Canyon I won’t identify, but it was the kind of wine I’ve been writing and thinking about: distinctly Californian, massively ripe and fruity. However you don’t get a wine that ripe without paying the price of excessive softness. The vintner consequently acidified the wine, so much so that in spite of a luscious aroma the first impression in the mouth was “Wow, is this ever sharp!” Acidity is a very tricky little beast. Wine needs enough of it to be lively and fresh, but it should never stick out. Well, maybe in certain white wines (Riesling, or a nice dry sherry), but not a dry red table wine, in which the acidity should be a secondary impression, not the primary one.

I read in Lewis Perdue’s news fetch that the TTB has reopened public comments on the Fort Ross-Seaview AVA. This is turning into another of those appellation wars over boundaries. The issue was that the original petition had defined a certain area, but a few growers to the north of the boundary challenged it and demanded to be included. The original petitioners said, No, we think we got it right in the first place. TTB, ever sensitive to controversy, has thrown up its hands and said, “We can’t decide, so let’s open the public comment period.” (Their actual statement was “Given the conflicting evidence…TTB has determined that it would be appropriate to re-open…” etc.) So here we go again. I’m not taking sides because I’m not familiar enough with the precise acres in question, but I hope they resolve this quickly, and by this time next year we’ll have a Fort Ross-Seaview AVA. It’s a unique, distinct growing area, the name has historical meaning (hearkening back to the first Russian colony), and we need to start carving up this silly Sonoma Coast mega-appellation ASAP.

If you want a chuckle, check out Tom Wark’s blog from yesterday. He takes on this guy, Parnell, and lets him have it right in the eye, Osama-style. Way to go, Tom, always a respecter, appreciator and defender of fine wine writing.

Blake Gray, honorable colleague, is now Blake Gray, CWP (Certified Wine Professional). Seems he took an exam and passed it. I’m glad Blake took a good-natured poke at himself (“Please do not use the abbreviation W. C. [i.e. water closet/toilet),” because now, I don’t have to. Congrats, Blake!

And now early Friday morning, sun coming up over Bien Nacido. I am waiting for a 7:30 a.m. pickup after a rousing late night at a restaurant in charming old Orcutt with a bunch of winemaker friends, some old, some new. I’ve developed a case of laryngitis from talking so much, but I managed to squeak out a thank you toast expressing the connection I feel to beautiful Santa Barbara County and its wonderful wines, which seem to get better with every visit.


Santa Barbara, here I come

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Off to Santa Barbara County very early this morning for my semi-annual tastings and winery meetings. As usual I look forward in particular to visiting Santa Barbara County. One of California’s most beautiful wine regions, it tends to get overlooked in favor of the North Coast (Napa-Sonoma). I’ve been told by SBC vintners that they do feel overshadowed by certain media who prefer to report on the wine country north of San Francisco.

It’s important for wine writers to show their faces. Sure, you can sit home and wait for samples to come in, and they will, but there’s nothing like actually getting to these places, to walk the vineyards and smell the wildflowers and meet new people and discover new, interesting things. I suppose it’s possible to taste through a bunch of Santa Rita, err excuse me Sta. Rita Hills Pinots at home and arrive at various conclusions, but to know those lands intimately (or as intimately as a non-resident can), to have discussed things with the growers and winemakers, and to have done so over a period of years, adds immeasurably to the experience. That’s not just to my benefit, it’s (hopefully) to the benefit of readers, with whom I can share the things I have learned.

There’s something else, too. Winery owners or CFOs or whoever makes the decision to send samples want to know that the person they’re sending to is serious. I’ve heard lots of complaints from winery personnel that it’s hard for them these days to know who’s a proper, credible reviewer and who isn’t. Mainly that’s because of the bloggers. Ten years ago, a winery had to send samples to maybe 8 or 10 reviewers. (P.R. people: weigh in on this, please. How many writers were you sending to in 2001?) Nowadays there’s a blogger everywhere, all clamoring for samples, not to mention writers for tiny little magazines of unknown provenance. No wonder winery proprietors are paranoid– and sending samples isn’t cheap. In my case, it’s to reassure proprietors that I’m still here, Wine Enthusiast still cares about them and their areas, and we want to continue or develop our partnerships into the future.

Partnerships? What do I mean by that? I mean that we, the wine media, need the wineries to keep us writers in business, so we have something to write about. And they, the wineries, need the wine media to publicize them (if they care about publicity to begin with, and most do). This partnership doesn’t imply anything complicit or unsavory. It’s a professional relationship, like any other, a symbiotic one that’s healthy for both sides. Relationships only get dysfunctional when they’re parasitic.

Not everyone wants, cares about or needs a visit from a writer like me. They’re happy to go their own way, for whatever reason. Maybe they’re doing just fine, and feel that a review could “fix” something that ain’t broken. Maybe they’re just shy. There are lots of shy winemakers; I could name some in Santa Barbara that hate chit-chat and public displays of forced affection almost as much as I do. I’m good at overcoming this inclination on my part, because it’s my job to get out there and socialize and, besides, I’ve discovered that the hardest part of socializing is the anticipation. Once I jump in, everything’s fine, especially if there’s lots of good liquid flowing. Some winemakers feel they have something to prove. They’re overbearing, constantly on message; they turn me off. That shrill approach may work with newbies, but not for long. Fortunately, most winemakers are sensitive and intelligent; they desire an adult conversation as much as I do. I’m hoping and trusting that will characterize my Santa Barbara meetings this week.


Santa Barbara update

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If you’re wondering why I didn’t have a new post yesterday, it’s because my #%@&*?! laptop had a nervous breakdown. I was on my last morning in Santa Ynez, and had a post in mind, but for some reason the ‘puter couldn’t figure out how to send it to the blog. I’ve had it with that antique laptop, and figure it was a sign from above to go out and buy a new one. On my way home, I stopped by my friend Thomas Reiss’s graphic design and web design firm, Kraftwerk, in SLO city, and his young, tech savvy staff recommended I buy the new Macbook Air, explaining that the reason it costs so much is due to the coolness factor. Well, I am nothing if not cool, so sometime this week, I’m heading over to the Apple Store with Chuck, who helps me organize the incoming wine but who also knows more about tech stuff than I do. Whether or not a new laptop will result in a better blog remains to be seen, but it certainly make this a more regular blog.

At any rate, I digress from what I wanted to talk about, which was my Santa Barbara trip. It was a quickie, mainly for an upcoming Wine Enthusiast article on what I’m calling “winemaker dives” — places where winemakers hang out with each other. These aren’t fancy white tablecloth restaurants where they do winemaker dinners or host important clients. They’re greasyspoons, hash houses, rock and roll bars, tacquerias and pizza joints, the kinds of places you and I frequent. Well, I do, anyway. And I had a great time. You’ll read all about it in the February issue, but we went to this funky old barbecue joint way up in the hills where the bikers lit up doobies and a hippie duo cranked out some pretty good Delta blues. That night we ate at a great pizza joint in Los Alamos that was packed with enough winemakers to teach a semester of undergrads at U.C. Davis.

Most of the talk in Santa Barbara was about the vintage, of course: the wild, crazy ride that’s been  2010. The mantra goes like this: bizarrely cold spring and summer. Massive heat spike in August. Then back to cold. Then last week’s rains, fairly heavy. The one bright spot is that right now we’re experiencing a welcome week’s worth of warm sunshine. As of this past weekend, I was told, there’s still Pinot Noir and Chardonnay to come in, as well as a boatload of Syrah. The Santa Rita Hills vintners were cautiously optimistic; so were the inland winemakers. My impression is that the Central Coast will have an easier time of it than the North Coast. But, as winemaker after winemaker emphasized, 2010 has been a challenge, in which vintners and growers alike had to rise to the occasion. One interesting comment from a winemaker was that, when everybody else was opening their canopies to expedite ripening during the cold months, he didn’t. “I knew the heat was coming,” he explained. “It always does.” As a result, he avoided the sunburning so common throughout the state. Or so he claimed.

A bunch of us also had a chat about the merits of labeling wine Santa Barbara County, or using the smallest appellation to which the wine is entitled. (The county’s other appellations are Santa Rita Hills, Santa Maria Valley, Santa Ynez Valley and Happy Canyon.) Some winemakers felt that they should use only Santa Barbara County, in order to promote the region to consumers. I, personally, feel that you should always use the most distinct appellation you can; but, on the other hand, my position is a critical and esthetic one, not a commercial one. I don’t have to sell wine. The winemakers do. So if they don’t want to use the smaller appellations because they feel it’s counter-productive, I have to respect that.

The Santa Barbarans also tend to feel overlooked by consumers. They think the average wine drinker doesn’t understand how good their wines are. They also think that the wine press doesn’t pay them enough attention, a belief with which I concur if we’re talking about certain well-known magazines. I myself have devoted lots of time and attention to Santa Barbara County for a long time, and I hope to pay it even more attention in times to come. This is a very important and very distinctive California winegrowing region, and it’s only going to get better.


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